The Allstate Foundation Domestic Violence Program

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One in four women experience domestic violence during her lifetime. And, research shows that lacking financial knowledge and resources is the main reason why victims of domestic violence return to or remain in relationships with their abusers. This type of abuse – called financial abuse – happens in 99% of all domestic violence cases. Financial abuse prevents victims from acquiring, using or maintaining financial resources. Abusers employ isolating tactics like preventing his partner from working or accessing a bank, credit card or transportation. Survivors of domestic violence and financial abuse need targeted tools and strategies to address financial struggles and plan for safe, secure futures. However, few resources exist for programs designed to assist survivors with the financial challenges they face. That’s why The Allstate Foundation is taking action. As the corporate foundation of a financial services company, we are uniquely qualified and equipped to provide survivors with financial knowledge, skills and resources. Since 2005, we have partnered with the National Network to End Domestic Violence, Inc. (NNEDV) to assist in the financial empowerment of domestic violence survivors. A social change organization, NNEDV works to create a society in which violence against women no longer exists. Together, The Allstate Foundation and NNEDV are working to helps survivors of domestic violence build their financial skills as a way to escape abusive relationships. Our Unique and Comprehensive Approach Since 2005, The Allstate Foundation has donated more than $43 million to help break the cycle of violence. The Allstate Foundation directly addresses the financial needs of survivors with a comprehensive program that includes the Moving Ahead Through Financial Management curriculum, Allstate volunteers and grant programs to support survivors and the organizations that serve them. Through the foundation’s national conferences, research and resources, domestic violence service providers learn the best ways to use financial empowerment services to positively change the lives of survivors. In order to stop the national crisis, The Allstate Foundation is also committed to raising public awareness and changing societal attitudes about domestic violence and financial abuse. Grant Programs The Allstate Foundation helps national, statewide and local nonprofits across the country provide financial empowerment services and funding support for survivors of domestic violence. Our nonprofit grantees empower survivors to gain or regain control of their finances in order to get free and stay free from violence. This includes financial tools and information that enable survivors of domestic abuse to fully understand their financial circumstances and to engage in short-term and long-term planning to accomplish their personal goals. Learn more information about all of the Allstate Foundation Grant opportunities here. Thought Leadership The Allstate Foundation is committed to spreading the best practices in financial advocacy. Through academic research initiatives and capacity-building conferences, The Allstate Foundation has become a leader in the financial empowerment of survivors of domestic violence. The 2009 Allstate Foundation National Poll revealed
  • More than 75 percent of Americans believe the recent economic downturn further strained domestic violence victims and survivors.
  • 67 percent of Americans believe the poor economy has caused an increase in domestic violence.[6]
  • Over $5.8 billion each year is spent on health-related costs of domestic violence.[7]
  • Nearly 8 million days of paid work each year is lost due to domestic violence issues-the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs.[8]
  • 96 percent of domestic violence victims who are employed experience problems at work due to abuse.[9]
  • 33 percent of all police time is spent responding to domestic disturbance calls.[10]
  • 57 percent of cities cite domestic violence against women and children as the top cause of homelessness.[11]
  • Survivors of intimate partner violence are overwhelmingly female.
  • Intimate partner violence against men is overwhelming committed by male perpetrators.[13]
  • 86 percent of victims of abuse by a boyfriend or girlfriend are women.[12]
  • million domestic violence incidents occur each year among women in the U.S. ages 18 and older.[14]
  • 74 percent of Americans personally know someone who is or has been abused.[15]
  • However, 75 percent Americans also fail to connect domestic violence with financial abuse.[16]
  • Approximately 6 out of 10 Americans strongly agree that the lack of money and a steady income is often a challenge faced by a survivor of domestic violence when leaving her/his abuser.[17]
References: [1] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Justice; U.S. Department of Justice – Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence; July 2000 [2]The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; Costs of intimate partner violence against women in the United States; April 2003 [3] National Domestic Violence Hotline; Fact sheet on Domestic Violence and Special Populations [4] National Network to End Domestic Violence; Communities Across the Nation, Lack of Funding for Services for Abused Women and Children; 2004 [5] ;National Network to End Domestic Violence; Communities Across the Nation; 2004 [6] The Allstate Foundation “Crisis: Economics and Domestic Violence” poll, May 2009 [7] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; Costs; April 2003 [8] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; Costs; April 2003 [9] American Institute on Domestic Violence; 2001 [10] National Center on Women & Family Law; Battered Women: The Facts; 1996 [11] The United States Conference of Mayors; A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America’s Cities; December 1999 [12] Matthew R.Durose et al., U.S. Dep’t. of Justice, Family Violence Statistics: Including Statistics on Strangers and Acquaintances 1, June 2005 [13] Stephan S.Owen & Tod W. Burke, An Exploration of the Prevalence of Domestic Violence in Same-Sex Relationships, 95 Psychological Reports, Aug. 2004 [14] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Justice; U.S. Department of Justice – Extent; July 2000 [15] Murphy Marketing Research, The Allstate Foundation National Poll on Domestic Violence, June 2006 [16] The Allstate Foundation “Crisis: Economics and Domestic Violence” poll, May 2009 [17] Murphy Marketing Research, The Allstate Foundation National Poll on Domestic Violence, June 2006